Barnett Fitness

Weight Lifting Routines
  • The Barnett Training System

  • Muscular Arms

  • Weight Training

  • Lean Body Development

Welcome

Welcome to Barnett Fitness - a health and fitness Website since 1994 with a focus on weight lifting routines.

My name is Robert Barnett - I've has been a health and fitness writer for over 20 years, and I've been a powerlifter, bodybuilder, fitness trainer and a United States Marine.

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I hope you can benefit from our website's free information and our health and fitness products.

WELLNESS PROGRAMS

Nutrition

Learn basic nutrition. Learn about the newest supplements. Lose weight and support a ripped body.

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Weight Training

Gain muscle, lose fat, and build a lean athletic and functional body.

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Flexibility

Learn about flexibility training .

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Stamina Tips

Gain stamina with the latest cardio routines. Supports a lean and ripped body.

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Weight Training March 2014

Weight Training Routines

March 2014

For the last six months my wife and I have been training at the Renaissance Hotel Sports Club. She has been doing Yoga, Weight Training, and Cardio and I’ve been doing Weight Training only.

  • Leg Extensions
  • Leg Curls
  • Toe Raises
  • Incline Machine Bench
  • Cable Lat Rows
  • Cable Shoulder Presses
  • Machine Curls
  • Machine Triceps
  • Ab Machine
  • Stretching Rack

All exercises 3 X 8 – 10.

Other Weight Training Routines

P90X3

Also, a month ago we started P90X3. It’s amazing how well you can do at our respective ages. I’m 66, my wife is 56 and my son who trains P90X3 with us is 26.

Regardless of age you just have to “show up”. I find most people my age have thrown in the towel. It’s nice to see Tony Horton of P90X support older fitness enthusiasts (he is in his 50′s), and if I can do P90X3 at my age all those younger than me have no excuses.

Find time to train only 30 minutes four to six times a week and you can likely change and extend your life.

More on P90X3 to come.

Fitness Training – Robert Barnett – 2nd. Quarter 2013

Weight Lifting Routines

Fitness Training – Robert Barnett – 2nd. Quarter 2013

Well today I listened to Ben Bernanke and there will probably be no reduction of QE until later this year. But regarding my weight lifting routines, there will be tapering.

These last three months I’ve only been doing gym training – both free weights and machines. I haven’t been doing TRX Rip Training but not by design. I still support this training for core development.

My training has been at the Renaissance Club Sports in Aliso Viejo, CA.  Again, they have the best equipment that I have ever used, and I’ve used them all. Typical Week:

Mon: Machines:  Chest Press, Lat-Pulldowns, Shoulder Press, Curl Machine and Triceps Machine.
Tue: Machines: Leg Extensions, Leg Curls, Standing Toe Raises, Ab Machine. I also do Planks.
Wed: Rest and Tai Chi
Thur: Same as Monday
Fri: Same as Tuesday
Sat: Tai Chi
Sun: Rest

General Comments: I’m 66 now (5/12/47) and I’ve had more aches and pains than I did last year. I’m very stubborn, and most frequently fail to warm-up properly and stretch even when my wife keeps encouraging me. As such, I end up with backaches which I address with foam rolling and Tylenol. Therefore, my advice to you if you are 50+ is to acknowledge your aging body. I truly haven’t made many age related adjustments to my training in ten years. My goal therefore is to incorporate much more stretching before and after workouts. I know that stretching before workouts is not good for max strength training, but I’m not doing that anymore – time to adjust. Additionally, I’m reluctantly trying to walk more. My wife and I bought Jawbone Up devices that monitor our activity and sleep, and it has been very revealing. My wife’s deep sleep patterns indicate a need for improvement, and the number of steps I take in an average day is far too little.  Regarding nutrition, we have both good and bad eating habits and even though we are seniors we really need to make some gradual changes. It would be great if I could drink less beer and my wife have less deserts. But on the other hand, we mostly eat very healthy and are disciplined with our supplementation. But it is time to make some changes! More stretching, more walking, better nutrition.

See Weight Lifting Routines for Workout Suggestions.

Robert Barnett 6/19/13

Fitness Training – Robert Barnett – March 2013

Fitness Training – Robert Barnett – March 2013

Fitness Training: I continue doing TRX Rip Training, and as I have said before, I have found that Rip Training provides me with a very good core workout and with good cardio benefits. Also, I do TRX Suspension Training and Dumbbell Training concurrently.

My training at the Renaissance Sports Club has been over-the-top great. They have the most modern equipment and I’ve used them all. If you want my comments on equipment, send me an email at tbts@earthlink.net and I’ll get back to you (50+ people only).

Typical Week:

Mon: Gym Workout – Free Weight Bench and Squats, Machines for other muscle groups.
Tue: Tai Chi
Wed: Rip Training and TRX Suspension Training
Thur: Gym Workout – Free Weight Bench, Machines for other muscle groups. (Renaissance has a great squat machine!)
Fri: Tai Chi
Sat: Tai Chi
Sun: Rest

I also continue to do Tai Chi as frequently as possible and as I’ve posted before, it supports my flexibility, balance and other health and fitness benefits. Take Care, feel free to email me for free information if you are 50+ in age.

Robert Barnett

Fitness Training – Robert Barnett – February 2013

Fitness Training – Robert Barnett – February 2013

Fitness Training: I’m currently doing TRX Rip Training and dumbbell workouts once or twice a week with a focus on reps and overall fitness. I have found that Rip Training provides me with a very good core workout and with good cardio benefits. I do TRX Suspension Training and Dumbbell Training concurrently in order to focus on more traditional exercises.

Additionally, I’m doing to the gym once or twice a week using modern machines with a focus on strength and muscle size. I’m a member of a Gym that is “state-of-the-art”. I use the machines and free weights to support strength and muscle growth.

I also continue to do Tai Chi as frequently as possible. I’ve been doing Tai Chi for decades and it supports my flexibility, balance and other health and fitness benefits. See my review on Tai Chi for more information.

Fitness Training – Robert Barnett – January 2013

Fitness Training – Robert Barnett – January 2013

I’m currently doing TRX Rip Training and Kettlebell Training. The combination works very well together and there is a focus on “functional training”. Rip Training is with asymmetrical exercises only, I have a resistance band attached to one end of a bar and the other end of the resistance band is attached to a wall or to another secure anchor point. These exercise work the core strongly and incorporate many functional movements. My Kettlebell Training focuses on the three basic swings including the Russian Swing, Power Swing and the American Swing. These exercises work the entire body and also provides an excellent cardio workout. If you are looking for a good Kettlebell book, I use the Kettlebell Rx by Jeff Martone. My results with this training protocol has been very good. I actually began TRX Rip Training months ago and recently incorporated Kettlebell Training. For those of you 50+ using swing movements has been used for decades. Kettlebell training has also been around for years and has a great track record. So if you want to change up your routine, try Rip Training combined with Kettlebell Training – it works for me.

Training – Robert Barnett

Training – Robert Barnett

training

Training – Months of August and September 2012

Currently I am exercising with this circuit. It combines TRX suspension training, Dumbbell training, and floor exercises for Abs and Core. It’s a long circuit that I repeat three times. It takes me about 20 minutes or less for each circuit or one hour in total. I’ve used this routine for one month as of this posting. My results are very good and I’ve also lost weight with this routine. I’ll use it for the month of September and then change things up. – R.Barnett

Circuit Training – 3 Circuits, 10 Reps or Less for each Exercise

  • TRX Suspension Chest Press
  • TRX Suspension Rows
  • DB Arnold Presses
  • DB Lateral Raises
  • TRX Suspension Curls
  • DB Curls
  • TRX Suspension Triceps Extensions
  • DB Kickbacks
  • TRX Suspension One-Leg Pistol Squats
  • TRX Suspension Step-back Lunges
  • V-Ups
  • Plank
  • Side Planks
  • Seated Medicine Ball Rotations
  • Skydiver Back Extensions

Reference TRX.com

Heart Disease

Heart Disease and Memory Loss

Diseases of the heart are the single largest cause of death after age 65. With increasing age, the heart becomes more vulnerable to disease. Even in the absence of detectable disease, the heart undergoes adverse changes with advancing age. Structural changes include a gradual loss of muscle fibers with an infiltration of fat and connective tissue.

Arteriosclerosis

Arteriosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, increases markedly with age, and is often regarded as part of aging. It is a progressive disorder and is present to some extent in practically all individuals by middle life. In general, blood vessels become less elastic with advancing age. With the gradual loss of elasticity, blood pressure may increase, and in general both systolic and diastolic blood pressures increase with age.

Since Arteriosclerosis results in a reduction in blood supply, there is less oxygen available to areas of the brain. Neurons in the brain are extremely sensitive to oxygen deficiency. Consequently, it is probable that neuron loss may be due in part to arteriosclerosis. Functional changes in the brain caused by neuron loss can account for the slowing of responses.

Memory Loss

Medical science has not identified why or how memory loss happens. We do know that chemical changes in the brain’s structure hinder the ability to process, store, and retrieve information. Some memory loss is associated with the loss of non-functioning brain cells. In addition, memory loss is related to blockages of the small blood vessels, so one of the keys to helping prevent memory loss will be to slow the process of arteriosclerosis.

Older adults experience memory loss, but only for memories of certain types. Episodic memory is the ability to remember specific events. This is typically the first type of memory to decline in old age. Associative memory is the ability to retrieve associations between actions or things. Associative memory declines dramatically with age. A chief memory complaint among older adults is a decreasing ability to associate a person’s name with his face. Yet other types of memory are spared in old age—the most common among these being recognition. It is therefore common for an older adult to recognize a person’s face while failing to recall that person’s name.

What can you do?

Monitor

  1. Take your own Blood Pressure

It is very important that 60+ people monitor their blood pressure on an on-going basis. This can be done most accurately at your Doctor’s office or at your drug store. It can also be done weekly using an inexpensive home monitor. In general, 115/75 is ideal. Elevated blood pressure can indicate heart related problems. If you notice an increase in blood pressure over a few days of readings, contact your doctor ASAP!
  2. 

Have your doctor monitor your Blood lipids and lipoprotein. These results can sometimes identify heart related problems before they become critical.

 

Take Action

  1. Quit Smoking. Cigarette smoking is the single most preventable cause of premature death in the US. Smoking cigarettes raises blood pressure and is one of the greatest causes of coronary heart disease.
  2. 

Aim for a healthy body weight. Obviously, obesity and overweight contributes significantly to heart disease.
  3. Focus on an overall diet quality rather than on individual foods or nutrients. Focus on the basics. See our Nutrition page.
  4. Engage in regular physical activity.
  5. Link to the American Heart Association Newsletter and review their advice AHA Link

Health Tips

Health Tips by Robert Barnett

health tips

The following health tips have helped to keep me in shape and healthy. Genetics is a factor, however, you can definitely help yourself and establish a healthy lifestyle.

Have a strong relationship with God

  • Regardless of your religious beliefs, a relationship with God is a life built upon a strong foundation.
  • I try to pray the Rosary everyday.
  • I try to go to Church on Sundays.

Exercise regularly

  • I Weight Train at least three times a week.
  • I try to stretch, do Yoga or Tai Chi as much as possible.

Eat well

  • I try not to eat red meat, and foods with high saturated fats.
  • I eat a lot of fruits and vegetables.
  • I try drinking a lot of water daily.
  • I take a strong multivitamin daily.
  • I eat “Zone Bars”, “Shakeology” and “P90X Bars” when I want to snack.

Keep Busy

  • Even though I am retired, I still work on my websites.
  • I am a Director of my Homeowners Association.
  • I have several hobbies I enjoy and I make time to do them.

Go to the Doctor on a regular basis

  • I have blood tests every year.
  • I have a colonoscopy every two to three years.
  • I log in to my Doctor’s gateway and email him when I need advice.
  • I go to the Dentist on a scheduled basis.

Weight Training Splits

Weight Training Splits

I believe that for most weightlifters the best split for muscularity is the “Four Day Split”.

The following are two of the most popular splits with the Four Day as our suggestion.

Three Day Split

  • Most weightlifters use the “Three Day Split”.
  • Full Body – Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
  • This split is generally good but there needs to be progression and variety.

Four Day

The next stage is a “Four Day Split”.

  • You can train Upper Body on Monday and Thursday and Lower Body on Tuesday and Friday.
  • I like to train Chest, Back and Shoulders on Monday and Thursday and Legs and Arms on Tuesday and Friday. I train core daily.
  • You can do more exercises than you did with the “Three Day Full Body Split” and you can train much harder which results in greater muscularity.
  • You will hit the upper and lower body twice a week, you can add more exercises than with the “Three Day”, and you can really train hard because you will have more recovery time. Muscularity is the product of hard training.

Summary of Splits

There are a number of bodybuilding splits. These range from easy to advanced. I explain the following splits in my eBooks:

Split

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

1

Three Day

on

off

on

off

on

off

off

2

Four Day 1

on

on

off

on

on

off

off

3

Four Day 2

on

off

on

off

on

off

on

4

Five Day 1

on

on

off

on

off

on

on

5

Five Day 2

on

on

on

off

on

on

off

6

Six Day

on

on

on

off

on

on

on

Weight Training 101

Weight Training 101

Weight Training: Research in exercise training has led to the recognition of a number of general principles of conditioning. These principles must be applied for a successful exercise program. – R.Barnett

Adaptation

Adaptation is the unique ability of the human body to adapt or adjust its functional capacity to meet desired needs. This is the root of all training and conditioning.

Specificity

This means that if one desires to develop strength, resistance or strengthening exercises must be employed. This principle is simple; however, it is frequently ignored. There are many fraudulent claims for an exercise system that promises overall physical fitness from one simple training technique.

Overload

Overload, means that to improve any aspect of physical fitness you must continually increase the demands placed on the appropriate body systems. To develop strength, progressively heavier weights must be lifted.

Progression

Individuals frequently make the mistake of attempting too rapid a fitness change. An example is a middle-aged man who has done no exercise for 20 years and suddenly begins a vigorous training program. The result is frequently an injury.

There are no hard-and-fast rules on how rapidly you should progress. In general it might be reasonable not to progress to higher levels of weight training more often than every one or two weeks.

Warm-up/cool down

Another important practice is to gradually warm-up. Start the exercise session slowly and gradually taper off at the end. The warm-up allows various body systems to adjust to increased metabolic demands. The heart rate increases, blood flow increases, and muscle temperatures rise.

Slow walking and stretching for 20 minutes or more at the beginning of your training is a good practice.  At the and end of your exercise session slow walking and stretching for five minutes is recommended. At the end of the five minutes the heart rate should be less than 120 beats per minute for weightlifters under 50 years of age.

Frequency, Intensity, and Duration

It is generally agreed that to build muscle size and strength, weight training must be performed on a regular basis. A frequency of about every other day or three days per week appears minimally sufficient.

The intensity of exercise required to produce benefits has been the subject of much study. Regular weight training at approximately 80% of your one-rep-max (1RM) is adequate to improve musculature.

In terms of general fitness, a reliable way to gauge exercise intensity is to measure the heart rate during exercise. Maximal heart rate can be estimated by subtracting one’s age in years from 205, and multiply the result times 80%. Exercising at 80% of intensity will improve physiologic functioning and provide health benefits.

I recommend that weight-training sessions be between 20 minutes and one hour. More or less is generally not recommended.